Homebrew

Brew A Legendary Ballantine Ale or IPA

Before Ballantine beer came in a shameful 40oz container and shared the shelf with Olde English and Colt 45, it was great beer.  Actually, they brewed some pretty amazing concoctions for back in the day. They were a large scale brewery with craft beer brewing care.  They self distributed locally and brewed seasonal and one time release brews.  Impressive to say the least.

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A Ballantine delivery truck from 1905

The Ballantine Brewing Company dates back to the 1840’s in New Jersey.  A Scottish immigrant named Peter Ballantine decided to commercially produce his well respected recipes. They were brewing quality beers under a few different names until the company closed in 1972.  Miller Coors now brews the beer and the original recipe has been flushed As of 2005.  During their years of brewing Pallantine released ales, lagers, porters, stouts, a dark lager, and a bock.  Their most prized beers were an aromatic IPA that was aged in wood for a year before bottling and the sought after Burton Ale.  This ale was aged for 10-20 years in wood before being gifted.  It was never sold commercially and was only given as a special Christmas gift to distributors and serious VIPs.

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The Elusive Burton Ale. Bottles of this this are still traded and auctioned off. Even today they still hold a nice flavor profile. Good luck finding one!
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A Balantine XXX Ale can
Ballantine IPA
Ballantine Wood Aged IPA

So you now have an idea about the amazing history of the Ballantine Brewery and the awesome legendary beers that USED to hold this name.  Here are two original Ballantine recipes for you to brew up.  However,  if you do the IPA…age it in wood for a year.  It just seems like the right way to finish this beer.

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Homebrew

Aunt Babette’s Beer and Other Receipts – 1889

I was rummaging through some more old books and came across “Aunt Babette’s Cook Book: Foreign and domestic receipts” c1889.  This is a Jewish cookbook published by The Bloch Publishing and Printing Company which had a location in Cincinnati, OH.  It’s an amazing collection of receipts and is well worth the read.

After reading some of Aunt Babette’s receipts for game,  I will never complain about my options at the dinner table again.  However,  I am intrigued by her Beer Soup, Hot Beer, and Eierbier receipts.  So, I did a little research.

Eierbier and Hot Beer:  This is a receipt that came over to America with the German and Polish immigrants in the 1800’s.  There are many records from the early 1800’s mentioning this odd beer concoction.  It was often described as a cold weather drink that is warm and creamy to enjoy.  Yuck!  I am not planning on trying this anytime soon.

Eierbier
<a href="http://beermumbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Eierbier.png"><img class=" wp-image-2094" alt="Eierbier" src="http://beermumbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Eierbier.png" width="700" height="750" /></a> Eierbier is a frothy and creamy drink that used to be used a cure all for the flu and common respiratory problems.  Served very warm with a spoon.

Beer SoupBelieve it or not, this dates back to the Carolingian Empire.  Beer soup for breakfast?  Indeed!

Beer Soup
<a href="http://beermumbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Beer-Soup2.jpg"><img class=" wp-image-2096" alt="Beer Soup" src="http://beermumbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Beer-Soup2.jpg" width="700" height="431" /></a> The recipe for beer soup has changed much over the years. This is what a traditional beer soup looks like with cheese added.

Here are some additional receipts that I found interesting:

Raisin Wine

yeast

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Fricasseed rabbit

Oyster Plant

If you would like to read the entire book of receipts,  you can download it here from BeerMumbo.  Cheers and please let us know if you decide to take on one of these receipts.

Beer News

Andre The Giant – The Baddest Ass Drunk Of…

As beer drinkers, we have all had our moments of “one too many“.  We tend to remember and talk about those mishaps.  You know, like the time you drank a 12-pack and fell asleep in your neighbors front yard.  Or the time when you saw a guy drink a case of beer by himself (I may or may not have done this myself).  Those are great and all but do not even compare to Andre the Giant’s legendary feats of drunken awesomeness!  I have taken the time to research every story I could possibly find to seal the title of “Baddest Ass Drunk Of All Time” for the Giant.

If you are unfamiliar with how popular Andre Rene Rousimoff was, I will just say that he was a global household name during his entire career.  Being a global name before the internet and cable television is a badass feat by itself.  He could not keep up with the demand for appearances.  Along with being so popular came big bucks.  I am talking $15-$25k for an appearance.  That was big money back then.  He knew how to party and was not afraid to spend his money on booze.  Andre was also known for running some very large bar tabs for his friends and himself.  Everyone loves a guy who pays the bill.  I am such a giant fan, I drink all my beer from my Giant Fist Shaped Drink Kooler.

Anyways,  here are some pretty awesome beer accomplishments by The Giant:

  • Andre the Giant drank and estimated 7,000 calories of beer everyday. Considering his beer of choice was usually Molsen Canadian I did the math:7,000 calories per day ÷ 150 calories per can = 46.6 beers per day. How true this is…I have no idea. Regardless, that is a lot of beer!

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  • According to some wrestlers, he would drink a case of beer before each match as a warm up.  Who needs a sports drink when you can have a beer or 24.

Andre the Giant card

  • When Hulk Hogan toured Japan with Andre, the giant would drink tall boys like water on the bus.  He would crush the can in his hand (yes one hand), and throw it at Hogan.  Whenever the bus stopped,  Hogan had to buy Andre as many cases of beer as he could carry back onto the bus.  Yes, Hogan was his beer wench.

Hulk Hogan Andre the Giant

  • In 1977, he drank an estimated 75 beers at a bar with “The American Dream” Dusty Rhodes and refused to take a taxi back to his hotel. He hated sitting in them because of his size. The decision was made to find another way back. He located a horse carriage, lifted the man off of it, and well…stole it.  The Giant and Rhodes took a drunken ride through Manhattan as onlookers watched in shock. Not a single person was willing to challenge the two and when the cops found them, they were drinking brandy at the hotel bar as if nothing happened.

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  • He once drank 119 bottles of beer in six hours…and actually passed out in a hotel hallway. He was so large nobody could budge him. Therefore, his friends hid him with a piano cover. Not a single person touched him while he slept that night. Who would be that stupid?

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  • He once had a $40,000 hotel bar bill while filming The Princess Bride.

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  • He once at 12 steaks, 15 lobsters, and emptied a restaurant’s entire bar. He was known to make restaurant stay open for hours after they closed so he could satisfy his appetite for food and booze. According to his friends, Andre would usually do this to impress people and the staff had no problem watching his impressive eating.

Andre

  • He hated to fly and would often wipe the entire plane’s bar stash out before take off.

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  • According Mike Graham, he witnessed The Giant drink 156 beers in a row. This was backed up by Dusty Rhodes and Michael Hayes.

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  • According to journalist Bill Apter, he sat and watched Andre and Harley Race pound beers over the period of a day while they were in New Orleans. The Giant drank 125 beers or more during their day together.
  • What is the most impressive story in my opinion? Apparently, one evening Andre was eating at a restaurant and hadn’t had a drink in a while. He was very cranky that evening and four guys made the mistake of taunting him. After ignoring their antics for a short period of time, Andre had his fill. He followed them out to their car and flipped the entire car over in a rage. Hogan was right, a drunk Giant was a happier giant.

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Homebrew

Family Beer Recipes from the early 1800s – America’s…

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We often forget about the importance beer played in the settlement of the country we love so much.  In the early 1800′s, beer was a huge component to the daily diet for the majority of most Americans including children.  Women even drank beer when they breast fed because it was believed to provide nutrients to the unborn child.  Kids also assisted in brewing beer and worked in breweries through the early 1900’s.  As a matter of fact, families kept sacred cookbooks that contained family beer recipes alongside food recipes that often dated back hundreds of years.  Until modern sanitation methods surfaced,  it was safer to drink beer than water.  If you were going boil water, why not make beer. People were a different kind poor back then.  When a family needed nutrition,  it was up to them to find a means to get by.  Beer played a crucial role in survival and social life.  If you didn’t have money to eat well…you drank well because it was cheap to brew items that could be fermented.

Beer consisted of locally acquired ingredients.   Hop pellets, specialty grains, lab controlled yeasts, and artificial flavorings did not exist.  An open fire with an iron pot is how you rolled.  If you wanted a cheap beer, items were collected and often mixed with molasses.  It was hard for families to acquire grains all the time.  Therefore,  other items were often used to grab sugars starches needed to make alcohol.

Anyways, I was recently given permission by the Cincinnati library and a few historical societies to view some of the rarest books in Cincinnati dating back to 1820.  Check out these awesome old time beer recipes.  Try one!  However, I promise they will not match our current selections.

Check these photos out:

Ohio Recipe Book of the 1820’s – 1820

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Family Receipts, or Practical Guide for the Husbandman and Housewife. Cincinnati – 1831

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White’s New Cook-Book – 1840

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Here are some bonus items found in this book from 1840.  Can chicken jelly can cure a hangover?  I am definitely not willing to give it a shot!

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Homebrew

Beer Recipes from 1840

We often forget about the importance beer played in the foundation of the country we love so much.  In the 1800’s, beer was a huge component to the daily diet for the majority of most Americans including children.  As a matter of fact, families kept sacred cookbooks that contained family beer recipes alongside food recipes that often date back hundreds of years.  Until modern sanitation methods surfaced,  it was safer to drink beer than water.  If you were going boil water, why not make beer.  People were a different poor back then.  When a family needed nutrition,  it was up to them to find a means to get by.  Beer played a crucial role in survival and social life.  If you didn’t have money to eat well…you drank well because it was cheap to brew items that could be fermented.

Beer consisted of locally acquired ingredients.   Hop pellets, specialty grains, lab controlled yeasts, and artificial flavorings did not exist.  An open fire with an iron pot is how you rolled.  If you wanted a cheap beer, items were collected and often mixed with molasses.

Anyways, I was recently given permission by the Cincinnati library to view one of the rarest books in Cincinnati dating back to 1840.  White’s New Cook Book is a collection of family remedies,  recipes,  and blueprints distributed to the residents of the growing Cincinnati area.  Check out these awesome old time beer recipes.  Try one!  However, I promise they will not match our current selections.

Check these photos out:

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Beer News

Beer History – Yeatmans Tavern

The original landing spot for travelers in Cincinnati was Yeatmans Cove.  The keelboats would land and the first Cincinnati legend (Mike Fink) and his crew would pull your keelboat to shore.  It was said 20-30 men would be needed to pull the keelboats.  However,  Mike Fink could do this alone (probably totally untrue).  The villagers described him as half man, half horse, half alligator who could out drink,  out fight, and out dance any man who stepped in his way.  The villagers must have drank a lot. Read more “Beer History – Yeatmans Tavern”

Beer News

Child Beer Labor

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In the late 1800’s kids as young as 8 worked in breweries all over the country. This is documented. They would usually be in charge of labor work such as cleaning. However, some even assisted in brewing beer. That is how they paid the bills back in the day.